Desperate enough to risk their lives: Afghans trying to flee Kabul return to airport where suicide bomber blew himself up just the day before, in almost hopeless attempt to get on one of the last planes out

 Desperate Afghans trying to flee Kabul have returned to airport where they risk the constant threat of another suicide bombing as the final hours of evacuation tick down. 

Flights resumed with new urgency on Friday, a day after a double suicide bombing killed at least 170 people, including 13 U.S. service personnel. 

Thousands of men, women and children are still trying to flee the Taliban, but their hopes are fading fast as the US and its allies are packing up their rescue operations ahead of the Tuesday deadline. 

The suicide attacks led Jamshad, who gave just his one name, to come early Friday with his wife and three small children, clutching an invitation to a Western country he didn't want to name.

This was his first attempt to leave, he said: 'After the explosion I decided I would try because I am afraid now there will be more attacks and I think now I have to leave.'

'Believe me, I think that an explosion will happen any second or minute, God is my witness, but we have lots of challenges in our lives, that is why we take the risk to come here and we overcome fear,' said Ahmadullah Herawi, also seeking to flee.

British Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said today that the 'gates were closed' and that the UK's final evacuation flights would end within hours.

The former Army Captain said soldiers would try to 'find a few people in the crowds' but admitted that not everyone will be flown out to safety.

Wallace estimated around 1,100 Afghans eligible for evacuation would be left behind by the UK, while up to 150 Britons would not be flown home.

Washington said on Thursday that more than 100,000 people had been safely evacuated from Kabul, but that as many as 1,000 U.S. citizens are still struggling to leave.

Joe Biden promised to 'rescue the Americans, we will get our Afghan allies out, and our mission will go on.'

But as the crowd becomes more frantic as the deadline looms, so too does the risk of a further terror attack.

Wallace said: 'The threat is obviously going to grow the closer we get to leaving. The narrative is always going to be, as we leave, certain groups such as ISIS will want to stake a claim that they have driven out the U.S. or the UK.' 

Crowds of Afghans outside the airport walls on Friday. Thousands of men, women and children are still trying to flee the Taliban , but their hopes are fading fast as the US and its allies are packing up their rescue operations ahead of the Tuesday deadline.

Crowds of Afghans outside the airport walls on Friday. Thousands of men, women and children are still trying to flee the Taliban , but their hopes are fading fast as the US and its allies are packing up their rescue operations ahead of the Tuesday deadline.


Men stand around in the sweltering heat outside Kabul airport hoping for the chance to catch a flight away from the fallen Afghanistan

Men stand around in the sweltering heat outside Kabul airport hoping for the chance to catch a flight away from the fallen Afghanistan

Children were among the throngs of people outside Kabul airport on Friday despite the constant risk of another terror attack

Children were among the throngs of people outside Kabul airport on Friday despite the constant risk of another terror attack

Crowds of Afghans, including children, crowd around a coach outside the airport. Many are still arriving despite the constant threat of another bombing

Crowds of Afghans, including children, crowd around a coach outside the airport. Many are still arriving despite the constant threat of another bombing


Crowds pack into the open sewer which runs around the airport perimeter just hours after it was the scene of carnage when a suicide bomber blew himself up
The scene of carnage after a suicide bomber blew himself up on Thursday

Crowds are seen yesterday (left) before an ISIS suicide bomber blew himself up killing scores of people (right) packed inside a canal around the perimeter of the airport

A Taliban fighter stands guard as bloody rags strew the ground where a suicide bomber blew himself up on Thursday

A Taliban fighter stands guard as bloody rags strew the ground where a suicide bomber blew himself up on Thursday

Taliban fighters stand guard as they block the road to Kabul airport on Friday, a day after the deadly blasts

Taliban fighters stand guard as they block the road to Kabul airport on Friday, a day after the deadly blasts

Injured victims of the airport bomb blast, receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul on Friday as they are comforted by relatives

Injured victims of the airport bomb blast, receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul on Friday as they are comforted by relatives

Distraught relatives load in a car the coffin of a victim of the twin suicide bomb attack at a hospital in Kabul on Friday

Distraught relatives load in a car the coffin of a victim of the twin suicide bomb attack at a hospital in Kabul on Friday

The UN refugee agency has estimated that up to half-a-million people could flee from Afghanistan in a 'worst case scenario' over the coming months.

The agency said on Friday that it would add to the 2.2 million Afghans who were already registered as refugees abroad - nearly all of them in Pakistan and Iran.

The agency cited estimates that 558,000 people had been internally displaced within Afghanistan this year due to armed conflict.

Crowds of people gathered at Kabul's Emergency Hospital to collect the bodies of loved ones after the bombings outside the airport. 

A boy sobbed in the back of a car, squeezed beside the coffin of a relative killed in the devastating blasts that quickly overwhelmed the city's hospitals. 

Bowing his reddened face between his crossed arms and wiping away tears with his scarf, the youngster stared down at the plywood box, wrapped shut with a white sheet.

Another Afghan, Abdul Majeed, came to the clinic to look for his brother, an 11th-grade student who was at the airport with no documents or papers, desperate to escape the 'troubles' of his home country.

'He wanted to fly abroad,' Majeed told AFP.

'Unfortunately, he's missing after the back-to-back blasts.' 

Majeed said overnight he saw hundreds of people, dead and alive, brought to the hospital, a major trauma clinic.

'I saw every one with my own eyes. My brother was not among them,' he said.

'Since yesterday, I have searched all the hospitals in Kabul but I have failed to find him.'

Majeed said his younger brother was a talented student, but 'such an atmosphere has been developed in Afghanistan that everyone wants to go abroad, and that's because of the troubles here.'

Others also came on foot, exhausted after a sleepless night, to sit in groups on the pavement outside the walls of the medical centre, waiting for news from within.

One man emerged from the gates clutching his mobile phone, showing a picture to those gathered outside of a loved one receiving treatment.

The bomb victim is lying in a bed, his eyes closed and face bandaged.

In a tweet on Friday, the hospital said the 'situation is still quite critical'.

'Our three operating theatres in the hospital have been working all night long - the last surgery was at 4am.'

'We have people in intensive care, in sub-intensive care.' 

The bombings on Thursday marked the deadliest day for U.S. forces in Afghanistan since August 2011.

In an emotional speech, President Joe Biden blamed the Islamic State group's Afghanistan affiliate, far more radical than the Taliban militants who seized power less than two weeks ago.

'We will rescue the Americans; we will get our Afghan allies out, and our mission will go on,' Biden said. But despite intense pressure to extend Tuesday's deadline, he has cited the threat of terrorist attacks as a reason to keep to his plan. 

A distraught boy is seen huddled inside the boot of a car next to the coffin of a loved one who was killed in the blast on Friday

A distraught boy is seen huddled inside the boot of a car next to the coffin of a loved one who was killed in the blast on Friday

Injured Afghans are seen with bandages covering their wounds at a hospital in Kabul on Friday after they fell victim to the terrorist attack

Injured Afghans are seen with bandages covering their wounds at a hospital in Kabul on Friday after they fell victim to the terrorist attack 

Taliban forces block the roads around the airport in Kabul on Friday following the deadly terrorist attack by ISIS-K

Taliban forces block the roads around the airport in Kabul on Friday following the deadly terrorist attack by ISIS-K

Relatives load in a car the coffin of a victim of the August 26 twin suicide bomb attack on Friday

Relatives load in a car the coffin of a victim of the August 26 twin suicide bomb attack on Friday 

A Taliban fighter stands guard after a double suicide bombing at Kabul airport

A Taliban fighter stands guard after a double suicide bombing at Kabul airport

Wounded women arrive at a hospital for treatment after two blasts outside the airport in Kabul on August 26, 2021

Wounded women arrive at a hospital for treatment after two blasts outside the airport in Kabul on August 26, 2021

Injured Afghans flee Kabul airport on Thursday night after two explosions and gunfire ripped through crowds
Injured Afghans flee Kabul airport on Thursday night after two explosions and gunfire ripped through crowds

Injured Afghans flee Kabul airport on Thursday night after two explosions and gunfire ripped through crowds 


Medics treat wounded Afghans at a hospital in Kabul on Friday after they were injured in the terrorist attack yesterday

Medics treat wounded Afghans at a hospital in Kabul on Friday after they were injured in the terrorist attack yesterday

An Afghan man lays on a bloodied hospital bed with a bandage on his head and hand after he was wounded in the attack

An Afghan man lays on a bloodied hospital bed with a bandage on his head and hand after he was wounded in the attack

The Taliban, back in control of Afghanistan two decades after they were ousted in a U.S.-led invasion following the 9/11 attacks, insist on the deadline.

The Trump administration in February 2020 struck an agreement with the Taliban that called for it to halt attacks on Americans in exchange for the removal of all U.S. troops and contractors by May; Biden announced in April he would have them out by September. 

The scenes at the airport on Thursday, with people standing knee-deep in sewage and families thrusting documents and even young children toward U.S. troops behind razor wire, have horrified many around the world as far-flung efforts continue to help people escape.

But those chances are fading fast for many. Some U.S. allies have said they are ending evacuation efforts, in part to give the U.S. time to wrap up its evacuation work before getting 5,000 of its troops out by Tuesday.

Britain said Friday its evacuations from Afghanistan will end within hours, and the main British processing center for eligible Afghans has been closed. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace told Sky News there would be 'eight or nine' evacuation flights on Friday, and they will be the last. British troops will leave over the next few days.

Taliban fighters carrying weapons are seen blocking the way for Afghans to make it to Kabul airport on Friday

Taliban fighters carrying weapons are seen blocking the way for Afghans to make it to Kabul airport on Friday

A suitcase and backpacks of Afghan people who were waiting to be evacuated are seen at the site of the terror attack on Friday

A suitcase and backpacks of Afghan people who were waiting to be evacuated are seen at the site of the terror attack on Friday

Clothes and blood stains of Afghan people who were waiting to be evacuated are seen at the site of the suicide bomb blast on Friday

Clothes and blood stains of Afghan people who were waiting to be evacuated are seen at the site of the suicide bomb blast on Friday

Pakistani soldiers are seen checking the documents of people before crossing into Afghanistan at the Chaman border point in Pakistan on Friday

Pakistani soldiers are seen checking the documents of people before crossing into Afghanistan at the Chaman border point in Pakistan on Friday

A Taliban fighter stands amid the clothes and belongings of Afghans who were waiting to be evacuated when the bomb hit

A Taliban fighter stands amid the clothes and belongings of Afghans who were waiting to be evacuated when the bomb hit

A young boy holds his knees in his arms while he sits in the boot of a car next to the coffin of a loved one who died in the terrorist attack

A young boy holds his knees in his arms while he sits in the boot of a car next to the coffin of a loved one who died in the terrorist attack 

A map showing the various entrances to Kabul airport and the site of the explosions which targeted a gate which was being manned by US troops

A map showing the various entrances to Kabul airport and the site of the explosions which targeted a gate which was being manned by US troops 

The Spanish government said it has ended its evacuation operation. And the French European affairs minister, Clement Beaune, said on French radio Europe 1 that France will end its evacuation operation 'soon' but may seek to extend it until after Friday night.

Untold thousands of Afghans, especially ones who had worked with the U.S. and other Western countries, are now in hiding from the Taliban, fearing retaliation despite the group's offer of full amnesty. The militant group has claimed it has become more moderate since its harsh rule from 1996 to 2001, when it largely confined women to their homes, banned television and music and held public executions.

But Afghans in Kabul and elsewhere have reported that some Taliban members are barring girls from attending school and going door to door in search of people who had worked with Western forces.

No one knows how effective the Taliban will be at combating the Sunni extremists of IS, who have links to the group's more well-known affiliate in Syria and Iraq and have carried out a series of brutal attacks in Afghanistan, mainly targeting its Shiite Muslim minority. 

Desperate enough to risk their lives: Afghans trying to flee Kabul return to airport where suicide bomber blew himself up just the day before, in almost hopeless attempt to get on one of the last planes out Desperate enough to risk their lives: Afghans trying to flee Kabul return to airport where suicide bomber blew himself up just the day before, in almost hopeless attempt to get on one of the last planes out Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 07:34 Rating: 5

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