Josh Hawley is told by to return $3,000 donation by Hallmark as Missouri senator faces cash crisis over leading 'treason caucus'

 Josh Hawley, the most prominent Republican who tried to overturn the election result and persisted after the MAGA riot, faced an escalating financial crisis Monday. 

Hallmark's political action committee told Popular Information's Judd Legum that it had requested a $3,000 donation back from Hawley, a Missouri Republican, and one of the ringleaders of the so-called 'treason caucus.' 

Hallmark is based in Kansas City, Missouri.  

The PAC - HALLPAC - also asked Sen. Roger Marshall, the newly minted GOP senator from Kansas, for a $5,000 donation to be returned. 

Hawley was the first senator who said he'd support a House GOP plan to challenge some of the Electoral College votes from swing states - an effort President Donald Trump supported, as it extended the farce he was feeding to his supporters that the election result could be overturned.  

That narrative - that the election was 'stolen' - motivated the MAGA mob to take over Capitol Hill Wednesday, a violent incident that killed five, including a Capitol Police officer. A second U.S. Capitol Police officer has taken his own life. 

Marshall was among the small group of GOP senators voting in the affirmative to challenge the results - votes taken after the riot. 

Hallmark said the actions of Hawley and Marshall 'do not reflect our company's values.' 'The peaceful transition of power is part of the bedrock of our democratic system, and we abhor violence of any kind,' Hallmark said.   

Sen. Josh Hawley was asked by Hallmark to give back the company's $3,000 donation for the role he played in Wednesday's riot. Here Hawley is photographed giving a clinched-fist salute to the MAGA crowd that would end up breaking into the Capitol Building

 Sen. Josh Hawley was asked by Hallmark to give back the company's $3,000 donation for the role he played in Wednesday's riot. Here Hawley is photographed giving a clinched-fist salute to the MAGA crowd that would end up breaking into the Capitol Building 

Marriott, Morgan Stanley, Dow and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association have all announced they will cut donations to the Republicans who voted to challenge Electoral College results in two states. 

Legum reported Monday afternoon that American Express will never donate money to that group of Republicans again. 

Like the tech companies, JP Morgan and Citibank said they will suspend giving political donations to members of both parties in the aftermath of the siege. 

Hallmark's statement comes after Hawley's publisher, Simon & Schuster, canceled his forthcoming book, 'The Tyranny of Big Tech,' about big tech censorship. 

It was supposed to be released in June.     

'We did not come to this decision lightly,' Simon & Schuster told The New York Times Thursday. 'As a publisher it will always be our mission to amplify a variety of voices and viewpoints: at the same time we take seriously our larger public responsibility as citizens, and cannot support Senator Hawley after his role in what became a dangerous threat.'   

The Missouri Republican responded by tweeting a statement 'on the woke mob.'

'This could not be more Orwellian,' Hawley responded to Simon & Schuster. 'We'll see you in court,' he offered, complaining that he was being canceled. 

He said he was just 'representing my constituents' and 'leading a debate on the Senate floor on voter integrity.' 

'Which they have now decided to redefine as sedition,' he wrote. 

Hawley also lashed out at President-elect Joe Biden after the president-elect said Hawley and Sen. Ted Cruz were guilty of spreading the 'big lie' - that voter fraud robbed Trump of a second term. 

 Biden then brought up Nazi propagadist Joseph Goebbels, explaining that if you keep 'repeating the lie,' that people will start to believe it. 

'President-elect Biden just compared me and another Republican senator to Nazis. You read that correctly,' blasted Hawley in a statement. 'This is undignified, immature, and intemperate behavior from the president-elect. It is utterly shameful,' Hawley added.    

At an event Friday in Wilmington, Delaware, Biden was asked if Hawley and Cruz should resign. 

'I think they should be just flat out be defeated the next time,' Biden advised. 'And I think the American public has a real good clear look at who they are.' 

'They're part of the big lie,' the incoming president added. 

Biden then went into a long-winded story about Goebbels and the bombing of Dresden. 

He then explained how Hawley and Cruz are complicit. 

'It's one thing for one man, one woman to repeat the lie over and over and over again,' Biden said. 'By the way, Trump said that before he ran, if you say it enough, I'm going to convince you, I'll say it enough: "the press is bad, the press is bad, the press is bad, the press is bad,"' Biden said to the room of reporters at Wilmington's Queen theater. 

'If he's the only one to say that that's one thing, but the acolytes that follow him, like Cruz and others, they are as responsible as he is,' Biden argued. 

Biden said that there were 'decent people' in the U.S. 'who actually believe these lies,' 

'The degree to which it becomes corrosive is in direct proportion to the number of people who say it, ' Biden said. 

'And so it's interesting to me, and I was pleased to hear some more prominent Republicans say to me that the Ted Cruzs of the world are as responsible in terms of people believing the lies, as - not as responsible - but similar responsible like Trump,' Biden said. 

The president-elect differentiated those lawmakers from Trump's incitement of the Capitol attack. 

'But they didn't say, go to the Capitol, I'll be with you, follow - that's a different story,' Biden said.  

On Thursday morning, Hawley had assigned himself no blame.  

'The responsibility of violent criminal acts is with violent criminals,' he told CNN Thursday. 

Hawley was first asked whether President Donald Trump should be blamed for the riot, which left four dead. 

'I don't think urging people to come to the Capitol was a good idea,' he told CNN's Manu Raju.  

Hawley was branded a traitor after he gave a clinched-first salute to the mob of waiting Trump supporters as he arrived on Capitol Hill for Wednesday's joint session of Congress to certify the Electoral College count in favor of President-elect Joe Biden. 

An objection to Arizona was being debated when MAGA-backing rioters mobbed Capitol Hill. 

Hawley put out a statement commending law enforcement for keeping senator safe. 

'Thank you to the brave law enforcement officials who have put their lives on the line,' his office tweeted around 4:30 p.m. 'The violence must end, those who attacked police and broke the law must be prosecuted, and Congress must get back to work and finish its job.'  

Sen. Josh Hawley told CNN Thursday, 'The responsibility of violent criminal acts is with violent criminals,' though he added that he didn't President Donald Trump's urging of people to come to Capitol Hill Wednesday was a good idea

Sen. Josh Hawley told CNN Thursday, 'The responsibility of violent criminal acts is with violent criminals,' though he added that he didn't President Donald Trump's urging of people to come to Capitol Hill Wednesday was a good idea 

Former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said that the image of Sen. Josh Hawley raising his fist in support would become a 'symbol of sedition'

Former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said that the image of Sen. Josh Hawley raising his fist in support would become a 'symbol of sedition' 

Hawley was also photographed giving Trump supporters a thumbs up. That crowd would later break inside the Capitol Building in a violent siege that lasted hours

Hawley was also photographed giving Trump supporters a thumbs up. That crowd would later break inside the Capitol Building in a violent siege that lasted hours 

Hawley was the first senator to announce he would sign on to a House GOP challenge of certain states' Electoral College vote counts

Hawley was the first senator to announce he would sign on to a House GOP challenge of certain states' Electoral College vote counts 

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted the image of Hawley and called on the Missouri Republican to 'resign immediately'

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted the image of Hawley and called on the Missouri Republican to 'resign immediately' 

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier set up around the U.S. Capitol Building to protect lawmakers as they certify the Electoral College results

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier set up around the U.S. Capitol Building to protect lawmakers as they certify the Electoral College results 

Democratic Coalition co-founder Scott Dworkin said Hawley 'needs to be arrested for his treason'

Democratic Coalition co-founder Scott Dworkin said Hawley 'needs to be arrested for his treason' 

Trump supporters gathered outside the Capitol and were given a show of support from Hawley before breaking into the building in a chaotic display for several hours Wednesday

Trump supporters gathered outside the Capitol and were given a show of support from Hawley before breaking into the building in a chaotic display for several hours Wednesday 

Sen Josh Hawley: Election objections should be heard
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Hawley also sent out a fundraising plea as the chaos kicked off, according to the Kansas City Star.  

That paper's editorial board lashed out at Hawley, headlining the piece, 'Sen. Josh Hawley has blood on his hands in Capitol coup attempt.'   

'Hawley’s actions in the last week had such impact that he deserves an impressive share of the blame for the blood that’s been shed,' the op-ed argued.  

The dean of the Missouri Republican Party,  former U.N. Amb. John Danforth, who, like Hawley, represented Missouri in the U.S. Senate, admonished his protégé. 

'Supporting Josh and trying so hard to get him elected to the Senate was the worst mistake I ever made in my life,' Danforth told The St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 

'Yesterday was the physical culmination of the long attempt [by Hawley and others] to foment a lack of public confidence in our democratic system. It is very dangerous to America to continue pushing this idea that government doesn’t work and that voting was fraudulent,' Danforth added. 

Wednesday on Twitter, the picture of Hawley, outside the Capitol Building, with a raised left fist quickly circulated. 

'The picture (among many) we will all remember from what we've witnessed today @HawleyMO - you are @realDonaldTrump's symbol of this sedition,' tweeted former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, who's a Trump critic. 

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio shared the image too. 

'None of today's violence happens without the seditious actions of @HawleyMo,' de Blasio wrote. 'He sparked a violent incident that endangered lives and threatened the sanctity of our democracy just to further his own political ambitions.' 

'He doesn't deserve his seat. He should resign immediately,' de Blasio said.  

Walter Shaub, the former director of the United States Office of Government Ethics, called Hawley the 'leader of the insurrection.' 

Shaub added that the Missouri Republican inspired 'traitors, vandals thugs, and rioters everywhere.'   

'Senator Josh Hawley is the epitome of a privileged American upbringing and education, and look how he has paid it back to our society,' historian Michael Beschloss tweeted.  

Democratic Coalition co-founder Scott Dworkin said Hawley 'needs to be arrested for his treason.'  

For weeks, Trump has misled his supporters into believing that his election loss could be overturned by Congress.

Lawmakers are able to object, debate and then vote on states' tallies - but the votes for that effort to be successful simply weren't there, nor does Congress truly have the power to overrule the Electoral College count, most scholars believe. 


For this reason, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell begged members of his caucus not to join House GOP efforts to object to the results - as a House member and a senator are both needed to move the process forward. 

Before rioters broke into the Capitol Wednesday, McConnell made a floor speech saying just as much.   

'We're debating a step that has neve been taken in American history, whether Congress should overrule the voters and overtrun a presidential election,' McConnell said. 

The Kentucky Republican discouraged the objections because there was no evidence of widespread voter fraud, as Trump has falsely claimed.   

'But my colleagues nothing before us proves illegality anywhere near the massive scale, the massive scale that would have tipped the entire election,' McConnell argued. 'Nor can public doubt alone justify a radical break, when the doubt itself was incited without any evidence.'   

Still, Hawley kept Congress in session until the early hours of Thursday when he single-handedly signed onto an objection to Pennsylvania's Electoral College vote count. 

That prompted two more hours of debate in the House. 

McConnell swiftly brought the objection to a vote and it was overruled 92-7.  

Earlier, when the Senate came back into session to debate the Arizona challenge, Hawley had argued, 'Violence is not how you achieve change.' 

Angry pro-Trump protesters at Capitol turn on media
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'And that's why I submit to my colleagues that what we're doing here tonight is actually very important. Because fo those who have concerns about the integrity of our elections ... this is the appropriate means, this is the lawful place, where those objections and concerns should be heard.'  

He said he hoped the Senate could address concerns 'peacefully, without violence, without attacks, without bullets.'

He used his time, then, to knock the way Pennsylvania carried out its election. 

'And so Mr President let me just say now, that briefly, in lieu of speaking about it later,  a word about Pennsylvania - this is a state that I have been focused on, objected to,' Hawley said. 

He then went on to complain that the state set-up 'universal mail-in balloting.' 

'And did it irregardless of what the Pennsylvania Constitution says,' Hawley said, using the improper word for regardless.    

Pennsylvania Democratic Rep. Conor Lamb pointed out that Pennsylvania's system had been set up by Republicans in his state. 

'I wanted to point out to all these lovers and supporters of the Pennsylvania legislature that it was the Republican Pennsylvania legislature that passed a Republican bill that they all voted for and supported that set up the system under which we just ran the election,' Lamb said during the House's floor debate of the Pennsylvania objection.  

Josh Hawley is told by to return $3,000 donation by Hallmark as Missouri senator faces cash crisis over leading 'treason caucus' Josh Hawley is told by to return $3,000 donation by Hallmark as Missouri senator faces cash crisis over leading 'treason caucus' Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 06:35 Rating: 5

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