Joe Biden is willing to negotiate on relief checks going to families making more than $150,000 as he meets 10 moderate Republican senators

 Joe Biden will meet with a group of Republican senators Monday at the White House, in a sign he is willing to negotiate and work across the aisle on the next coronavirus relief package.

On Sunday, a group of 10 moderate Republicans, including Senators Mitt Romney, and Susan Collins, drafted up a $600 billion bill, which is only one-third the price tag of the $1.9 trillion package Biden is already considering.

Later Sunday evening, Biden invited that group to the White House to talk about the opposing bills and potentially reach some compromises.


'As has been widely reported, the President received a letter today from 10 Republican Senators asking to meet with him to discuss their ideas about the actions needed to address these crises,' White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement announcing the meeting.

'In response, the President spoke to Senator Collins, and invited her and other signers of the letter to come to the White House early this week for a full exchange of views,' she continued.

An official told CNN that the White House is specifically open to considering scaling down stimulus checks for families whose latest tax filings show they made more than $150,000.

Biden's America Rescue Plan includes $1,4000 relief checks – Republicans are proposing that amount be lowered to $1,000. 

President Joe Biden will meet with a group of 10 moderate Republicans at the White House on Monday as his administration signaled he is willing to negotiate on the price tag of the next round of stimulus checks for families making $150,000

President Joe Biden will meet with a group of 10 moderate Republicans at the White House on Monday as his administration signaled he is willing to negotiate on the price tag of the next round of stimulus checks for families making $150,000

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki released a statement Sunday that Biden would take a meeting with the group of GOP senators on Monday to discuss the next coroanvirus relief bill

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki released a statement Sunday that Biden would take a meeting with the group of GOP senators on Monday to discuss the next coroanvirus relief bill

This is Biden's first White House meeting with lawmakers – and Republicans were able to score that spot before the likes of some top Democratic leaders like Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

It's still not clear whether Biden will be receptive to any of the Republican proposals, but just taking the meeting is signalling he's trying to stick to his oft-repeated message of 'unity.'

'The President spoke to Speaker Pelosi and Leader Schumer today; he is grateful that Congress is prepared to begin action on the American Rescue Plan in just his second full week in office,' Psaki said in her statement.

She added: 'Americans of both parties are looking to their leaders to meet the moment.'

Some GOP proposals, like cutting off an extension of unemployment benefits, are a nonstarter for the administration.

The group of 10 Republicans sent a letter to Biden on Sunday requesting a meeting to discuss a coronavirus relief package compromise they feel could gain swift support from both parties. 

'In the spirit of bipartisanship and unity, we have developed a COVID-19 relief framework that builds on prior COVID assistance laws, all of which passed with bipartisan support,' the moderate Republicans wrote in their letter to the president. 

Susan Collins, a Republican senator for Maine, led the group in suggesting an alternative to the Biden administration's plan.  

A group of 10 moderate Republicans, in an effort led by Senator Susan Collins of Maine (right), are proposing a $600 billion package as a counter to Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah (right) has also signed on board with the counter-plan

A group of 10 moderate Republicans, in an effort led by Senator Susan Collins of Maine (right), are proposing a $600 billion package as a counter to Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah (right) has also signed on board with the counter-plan

The group of moderate Republican senators , including Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, are preparing to unveil more details of the plan Monday as they prepare to meet with Biden

The group of moderate Republican senators , including Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, are preparing to unveil more details of the plan Monday as they prepare to meet with Biden

'In the spirit of bipartisanship and unity, we have developed a COVID-19 relief framework that builds on prior COVID assistance laws, all of which passed with bipartisan support,' the senators wrote in a letter to Biden on Sunday

'In the spirit of bipartisanship and unity, we have developed a COVID-19 relief framework that builds on prior COVID assistance laws, all of which passed with bipartisan support,' the senators wrote in a letter to Biden on Sunday

Bill Cassidy, a Republican senator for Louisiana, who is also involved in the effort, told Fox News that they were seeking a smaller $600 billion deal, which would include direct payments of $1,000.

Biden wants a $1.9 trillion package that includes $1,400 in direct payments, funding for schools and state and local governments and money to ramp up vaccine distribution.


'With the virus posing a grave threat to the country, and economic conditions grim for so many, the need for action is urgent, and the scale of what must be done is large,' Psaki said.

'As leading economists have said, the danger now is not in doing too much: it is in doing too little.' 

Chuck Schumer, the Senate Majority Leader, suggested last week that Democrats were willing to go it alone on the coronavirus relief package, potentially starting the process as soon as next week.

But Republican senators are concerned at talk of forcing the package through without achieving consensus.

Rick Scott, a senator for Florida, said that Biden's relief bill 'makes no sense' and is little more than a 'payback to the radical left'.

'We're ten days into the administration, now he's [Biden] already saying he doesn't care to work with Republicans?' Scott told Fox News.

Rick Scott, a Florida senator, has accused the Biden administration of being beholden to the 'radical Left'

Rick Scott, a Florida senator, has accused the Biden administration of being beholden to the 'radical Left'


'You know, he's going to try to get this done with Bernie Sanders with just 50 Democrat votes. That doesn't make any sense.'

Biden and Sanders have both pointed to a legislative process known as budget 'reconciliation' to force the bill through Congress if Republicans won't support the proposal.

Sanders said: 'Are we going to address the incredible set of crises and the pain and the anxiety which is in this country? You know what? I don't care what anybody says. We have got to deal with this pandemic.

'If Republicans want to work with us, they have better ideas on how to address those crises, that's great,' he said.

'But to be honest with you, I have not yet heard that.'  

Scott responded: 'This radical left agenda is not worried about the fact that we have $27 trillion worth of debt?

'We're not living even close to within our means. I mean, this makes no sense.

'This is just payback to the liberal left.'

Biden on Friday said he was willing to bypass the Republicans if need be.

'I support passing COVID relief with support from Republicans if we can get it, but the COVID relief has to pass,' he said.

'There's no ifs, ands or buts.'

Earlier on Sunday Biden's senior adviser Cedric Richmond said the president was still committed to trying to find a bipartisan solution.

'The president said in his inauguration speech that he wanted to work with both sides in order to help the American people,' Richmond, a former Louisiana representative, told 'NBC's 'Face the Nation' Sunday morning.

'What we know about President Biden is it's never about him, it's always about the people,' the White House senior adviser continued. 'So yes, he's very willing to meet with anyone to advance the agenda.'  

White House Senior Advisor Cedric Richmond said Sunday morning that President Joe Biden is willing to meet with the 10 Republican senators proposing a $600 billion coronavirus relief package as a counter to his $1.9 trillion bill

White House Senior Advisor Cedric Richmond said Sunday morning that President Joe Biden is willing to meet with the 10 Republican senators proposing a $600 billion coronavirus relief package as a counter to his $1.9 trillion bill

Republican Senator Bill Cassidy, one of the co-sponsors of the latest proposal, said Democrats only want the appearance of bipartisanship without working with Republicans. He also said their proposal includes $1,000 direct checks for Americans in the midst of the pandemic

Republican Senator Bill Cassidy, one of the co-sponsors of the latest proposal, said Democrats only want the appearance of bipartisanship without working with Republicans. He also said their proposal includes $1,000 direct checks for Americans in the midst of the pandemic

Senator Bernie Sanders said it's more important to get a deal passed as soon as possible to get relief to Americans rather than work in the spirit of bipartisanship and drag the process out

Progressive Senator Bernie Sanders said it's more important to get a deal passed now to get relief to Americans rather than work in the spirit of bipartisanship and drag the process out

Biden to push for bipartisan support of $1.9 trillion COVID package
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The group of Republicans will unveil on Monday a $600 billion stimulus bill to address the coronavirus crisis, which is meant to act as a counter balance to Biden's $1.9 trillion package but appeal to some hesitant Republicans. 

'Our proposal reflects many of your stated priorities, and with your support, we believe that this plan could be approved quickly by Congress with bipartisan support,' the letter continued.

'We request the opportunity to meet with you to discuss our proposal in greater detail and how we can work together to meet the needs of the American people during this persistent pandemic.'

The letter was signed by 10 upper chamber Republicans considered more moderate, including Senators Romney of Utah, Collins of Maine, Murkowski of Alaska, Cassidy of Louisiana and Rob Portman of Ohio, Shelly Moore Capito of West Virginia, Todd Young of Indiana, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Michael Rounds of South Dakota. 

Biden has been pushing hard to get his COVID relief plan through Congress, in the face of strong opposition by Republicans. On Friday he indicated that he will move forward even without Republican support as he warned of a steep and growing 'cost of inaction' on his plan during a meeting with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen

Biden has been pushing hard to get his COVID relief plan through Congress, in the face of strong opposition by Republicans. On Friday he indicated that he will move forward even without Republican support as he warned of a steep and growing 'cost of inaction' on his plan during a meeting with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen  

The progress of Biden's package to support individuals and businesses will be an early test of the new president's promise to work across the political divide and deliver on his message of 'unity.'

Some Republicans, after losing control of the Senate earlier this month, have questioned the cost of the latest relief bill, while others urged more targeted measures.

'We recognize your calls for unity and want to work in good faith with your Administration to meet the health, economic, and societal challenges of the COVID crisis,' the senators concluded in their letter.

Rob Portman announced he will not seek re-election in 2022, paving the way for him to be more outspoken and work in a more bipartisan manner before retiring from Congress.

After losing two Georgia runoff elections in early January, the Senate now sits at a 50-50 split with Democrat Kamala Harris, who served in the Senate for one term before becoming vice president, holding the tie-breaking vote.

During her time in the Senate, Harris was rated as the most politically left-leaning lawmaker.

The letter from the group of Republicans details several of the proposals they feel will please both sides of the political aisle.

Cassidy said Sunday during his Fox interview that the bill would include $1,000 direct payments to Americans. He didn't specify any income threshold like an earlier version that proposed sending the checks to those who made $75,000 in 2019. 

Republicans claim their plan will also echo Biden's call for more funding to boost vaccines and testing as well as support for schools and child care centers, but said their plan would include more targeted assistance for families in need and additional funds for small businesses.

While offering few specifics, they said their plan echoed Biden's call for more funding to boost vaccines and testing as well as support for schools and child care centers, but said their plan would include more targeted assistance for families in need and additional funds for small businesses. 

Congress, controlled by Democrats, is set to move this week on Biden's plan to deliver a fresh infusion of COVID-19 relief to Americans and businesses reeling from the pandemic, which has killed more than 430,000 people in the United States.

Cassidy detailed that the GOP proposal offers $20 billion in school funding, instead of Biden's $170 billion. 

The Republican senator said funneling more money into these schools would just perpetuate teachers' unions' perspective against returning to in-person teaching.

He said, however, that one area of agreement between the parties is vaccinations.

The Republican bill would match the White's House's $160 billion figure to distribute and administer shots. 

The hashtag exploded over the weekend after the Democratic Party posted a tweet outlining Biden's plan to distribute $1,400 stimulus checks American families, on top of the $600 checks that were approved earlier this month

The hashtag exploded over the weekend after the Democratic Party posted a tweet outlining Biden's plan to distribute $1,400 stimulus checks American families, on top of the $600 checks that were approved earlier this month


The hashtag BidenLied was trending on Twitter over the weekend, as Americans demanded the $2,000 stimulus checks they claim Biden promised to deliver during his campaign.   

The hashtag exploded after the Democratic Party posted a tweet outlining Biden's plan to distribute $1,400 stimulus checks to American families, on top of the $600 checks that were approved earlier this month. 

Critics expressed outrage at the size of the forthcoming checks - which are expected to get the green light from Congress this week - as they accused Biden of going back on his word.  

But in reality the new president never made that promise, instead saying that he would add on to the original $600 checks for a total of $2,000.  

Joe Biden is willing to negotiate on relief checks going to families making more than $150,000 as he meets 10 moderate Republican senators Joe Biden is willing to negotiate on relief checks going to families making more than $150,000 as he meets 10 moderate Republican senators Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 07:37 Rating: 5

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