'If that were true, nobody would work for us': Amazon rejects claims that overworked and underpaid employees have to urinate in bottles

 Amazon shot back at criticism from Rep. Mark Pocan on Wednesday in usually strident terms after the Democrat from Wisconsin claimed the company was busting a union and forced workers to urinate in bottles.

Ahead of a visit from Senator Bernie Sanders to an Amazon order-fulfillment center in Alabama where some employees are pressing for a union, the company's chief executive for its worldwide consumer business, Dave Clark, tweeted on Wednesday that he welcomed the visit.

Pocan responded incredulously, charging that Amazon's claims to be a 'progressive' workplace are bunk. 


'Paying workers $15/hr doesn't make you a "progressive workplace" when you union-bust & make workers urinate in water bottles,' he said in a Wednesday night tweet. 

Amazon's corporate communications department hit back at Wisconsin Rep. Mark Pocan unusually stridently for a big company, which usually tend toward more cautious statements

Amazon's corporate communications department hit back at Wisconsin Rep. Mark Pocan unusually stridently for a big company, which usually tend toward more cautious statements

People across the country have turned out to rally in favor of the effort of Amazon employees in Alabama to unionize, even as far away as Philadelphia, where people picketed this month

People across the country have turned out to rally in favor of the effort of Amazon employees in Alabama to unionize, even as far away as Philadelphia, where people picketed this month

Pocan's claims weren't new - he was recycling allegations that have been aired before, but this time they drew an usually strong response from Amazon's corporate communications department.  

'You don’t really believe the peeing in bottles thing, do you?' the Amazon account tweeted. 'If that were true, nobody would work for us. The truth is that we have over a million incredible employees around the world who are proud of what they do, and have great wages and health care from day one.' 

Clark said the company hoped its example would encourage lawmakers to enact policies that would push other companies to offer benefits and pay the $15 an hour that Amazon has as a starting wage. 

'I often say we are the Bernie Sanders of employers, but that's not quite right because we actually deliver a progressive workplace,' Clark tweeted. 'A $15 minimum wage, health care from day one, career progression, and a safe and inclusive work environment.' 

Dave Clark, the CEO of Amazon's consumer division, called the environment provided by the e-commerce giant a 'progressive workplace' due to the $15 an hour wages, provoking criticism from politicians
'Paying workers $15/hr doesn't make you a "progressive workplace,' Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin said to Amazon

Dave Clark, the CEO of Amazon's consumer division, called the environment provided by the e-commerce giant a 'progressive workplace' due to the $15 an hour wages. But 'paying workers $15/hr doesn't make you a "progressive workplace,' Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin replied


It was the latest in an ongoing melee between Amazon and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders who has been working on federal minimum wage increase to $15 an hour - along with supporting a union drive at Amazon's Alabama fulfillment center.

Union advocates have charged Amazon with using dishonest tactics to discourage people from voting for a union; Amazon has charged that it's simply telling the truth.    

Sanders also called out Amazon founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos out in an MSNBC interview.

'Jeff you're worth $182 billion, that's a lot of money. What is your problem with allowing workers in Alabama to organize for better wages and working conditions? You can afford to pay them more,' Sanders said earlier this month.  

On Friday, the Democratic Socialist criticized Bezos at a budget committee hearing in which the senator charged that employees work long, hard hours without job securities expected from one of the wealthiest men in the world, Newsweek reported.     

Amazon's global CEO for its consumer business tweeted ahead of a visit from Sen. Bernie Sanders; his tweet drew brickbats from critics that say the company doesn't live up to the hype

Amazon's global CEO for its consumer business tweeted ahead of a visit from Sen. Bernie Sanders; his tweet drew brickbats from critics that say the company doesn't live up to the hype

Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin shot back and alleged the company made workers pee in bottles because of a lack of break time; he amplified allegations that Amazon was busting a union

Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin shot back and alleged the company made workers pee in bottles because of a lack of break time; he amplified allegations that Amazon was busting a union

The bout comes ahead of an official visit by the Vermont senator to the facility in Alabama where workers are attempting to unionize as they have at other distribution facilities.    

Sanders recently ran a two minute video on social media explaining his support for collective bargaining for Amazon employees.   

Many came to Pocan's defense including UK journalist James Bloodworth who wrote a book after working low wage jobs for corporations such as Amazon. 

In fact, the practice of peeing in bottles to maintain workflow in Amazon warehouses is fairly well-documented.

Even delivery drivers claim to be under such pressure that relieving oneself couples with threats of joblessness.

According to Brookings, Amazon and Walmart combined raked in about $10.7 billion in profits over the course of the pandemic signaling a 56% increase in business, something the institute attributed to Americans spending more on home delivery rather than venturing out the stores to avoid exposure during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The two corporations, Brookings said, could have quadrupled compensation for their workers and still turned a handsome profit compared to the year prior.

Moreover, by October 2020, Amazon recorded that about 20,000 employees had been sick with COVID-19 after many workers came forward about the hazardous conditions in facilities.

Despite receiving a $15 an hour wage, Amazon employees are organizing to demand better working conditions after it was revealed that many are forced to urinate in bottles

Despite receiving a $15 an hour wage, Amazon employees are organizing to demand better working conditions after it was revealed that many are forced to urinate in bottles

'If that were true, nobody would work for us': Amazon rejects claims that overworked and underpaid employees have to urinate in bottles 'If that were true, nobody would work for us': Amazon rejects claims that overworked and underpaid employees have to urinate in bottles Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 07:02 Rating: 5

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