REVEALED: 205 people have donated their stimulus checks to controversial pastor Tony Spell as he ignores his house arrest and defies state lockdowns to perform services

Pastor Tony Spell said 205 people have donated at least part of their coronavirus stimulus checks to his church after urging parishioners to the join the #PastorSpellStimulusChallenge. 
This comes as Spell has actively ignored his house arrest orders and defied lockdown guidelines to host packed services in Louisiana.
Louisiana has 28,001 confirmed coronavirus cases and a death toll of 1,862. Public health experts feared that the state would mirror epicenter New York as cases skyrocketed. 
The controversial pastor of Life Tabernacle Church in Louisiana revealed more than 200 people have given up part of their $1,200 stimulus checks to Spell since he introduced the challenge on April 19. 
He told TMZ that the donations came from both parishioners and outsiders who felt compelled to help Spell's church during the pandemic. 
Spell would not say how much the donations add up to. 
Pastor Tony Spell (pictured) revealed 205 people have donated part of their coronavirus stimulus checks as part of his #PastorSpellStimulusChallenge
Pastor Tony Spell (pictured) revealed 205 people have donated part of their coronavirus stimulus checks as part of his #PastorSpellStimulusChallenge
Both parishioners and outsiders have reportedly sent money to Life Tabernacle Church (pictured) near Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Both parishioners and outsiders have reportedly sent money to Life Tabernacle Church (pictured) near Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
Spell (pictured) held a church service where he showed off his ankle monitor to the congregation
Spell (pictured) held a church service where he showed off his ankle monitor to the congregation 
DailyMail.com reached out to Spell for further comment.   
Spell first introduced the #PastorSpellStimulusChallenge while broadcasting to more than 300,000 viewers. 
He said the money would go to missionaries and evangelists.   
Rule no. 2,' he says, 'Donate your stimulus money. Rule no.3 donate it to evangelists, north American evangelists who haven't had an offering in a month. Missionaries who haven't had an offering in a month. Music ministers who haven't had an offering in a month.'
Spell says he, his wife and his son are donating their own.
The pastors adds that if viewers don't belong to a church they can donate via his website.
The clip posted on YouTube garnered thousands of comments, with some asking whether Spell's church should be using regular donations to help missionaries. 
He defended the reactions in an interview with CNN and said the church is giving to those in need. 
'Non-profits and faith-based programs can apply for the Paycheck Protection Program,' CNN's Victor Blackwell told Spell. 
But Spell replied: 'We don't want to.'
Blackwell hit back: 'But that is your choice.'
The anchor pointed out that many members of Spell's congregation have trouble getting transport to his church, just outside Baton Rouge and have to be picked up to attend services.
He added: 'Why not give that money to them and why isn't this a time for the church to give to those who do not have?' 
Spell has received backlash for continuing to host packed Sunday services with parishioners in defiance of stay-at-home orders
Spell has received backlash for continuing to host packed Sunday services with parishioners in defiance of stay-at-home orders 
'This is a challenge,' Spell said. 'We are challenging you, if you can, (to) give your stimulus package to evangelists and missionaries who do not get the stimulus package. They don't file taxes the way you and I do.'
Spell explained: 'We do not want SBA loans. We don't want the government to give us a dime. We are happy to provide for ourselves.'
Spell, whose social distance-flouting antics have made him the subject of criticism, also revealed this week that he plans to hold yet another Sunday service in defiance of state stay-at-home orders.  
Spell's said some 800 people reportedly attended his service and he hopes to see a bigger turnout this weekend.
Photos and videos of Spell's services have received backlash as they show parishioners blatantly bypassing stay-at-home orders. 
Pictured: Members of the Life Tabernacle Church sing spiritual songs and hold their hands in the air as they wait for pastor Tony Spell to leave the East Baton Rouge Parish jail
Pictured: Members of the Life Tabernacle Church sing spiritual songs and hold their hands in the air as they wait for pastor Tony Spell to leave the East Baton Rouge Parish jail
Protective gear appeared non-existent among Spell's congregation, with several attendees forgoing face masks, gloves and standing shoulder-to-shoulder in pews. 
On Easter Sunday, Spell had more than 1,300 people in his church to celebrate the holiday.  
One 78-year-old parishioner died of coronavirus in the wake of Spell's continual services. Spell denied the diagnosis. 
But beyond violating the governors public health orders, Spell has actively defied a judge's orders to remain on home arrest after he tried to run over a protestor.  
Spell was arrested for assault after he admitted he drove his church bus toward a man who had been protesting his decision to continue holding mass gatherings at his church in defiance of the state's coronavirus lockdown.   
Video shot by the station WAFB shows Spell, dressed in a suit and tie, with his hair slicked back, being surrounded by officers wearing face masks and placed in handcuffs.
Spell (pictured in his mugshot) was arrested for trying to reverse a bus over a protestor
Spell (pictured in his mugshot) was arrested for trying to reverse a bus over a protestor
Spell is heard on the recording complaining after his Bible was taken away from him during the arrest.
'My rights to have church and to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ are endowed to me by my creator, not my district attorney, not my chief of police and not my governor, John Bel Edwards,' Spell said after exiting the jail on Tuesday afternoon. 'Not my president and not my Department of Justice.'
He went on: 'my inalienable rights are given to me by God and those rights are my rights to assemble and have church. I cannot give up those rights.'
Spell claimed that he preached to his fellow inmates inside the jail and warned guards that if they used profanities, he would quote scriptures.
The pastor denied any wrongdoing, saying, 'the only thing I'm guilty of is practicing my faith.'
Before Spell was released, one Spell supporter shouted defiantly at Trey Bennett, the protester Spell is accused of assaulting. 
Bennett also showed up at the jail, carrying his protest sign. It says 'Close this church' on one side and 'Danger: coronavirus incubator' on the other.  
Debbie Dougherty, administrative assistant to the chief at the Central Police Department, said Spell had driven a church bus in reverse in the direction of the sign-holding protester.
Spell already faces misdemeanor charges for holding in-person church services despite the ban on gatherings.
Spell (pictured) left the local jail after posting bond for his assault charge on April 21
Spell (pictured) left the local jail after posting bond for his assault charge on April 21 
Authorities have said they did not book him into jail previously because they did not want to add to the jail population at a time when the highly infectious disease is running rampant.
They have not taken any action to close his church. 
He was put on house arrest after posting bail, flashing a peace sign when walking out of jail to thunderous applause from his supporters. 
His congregation showed up for him in full force afterwards, waving signs, whooping and hollering in agreement and some furiously shaking tambourines. 
Although more than 100 people were inside the church, all standing close together and very few wearing face masks, Spell said the church was practicing social distancing, saying: 'If you ain't from the same house don't touch.' 
At one point, Spell props his leg atop a speaker to show the congregating his ankle monitor.
'We're not hiding any more,' said Spell, as parishioners cheered in the background.  
Despite his apparent disdain for stay-at-home orders,  Spell said he wouldn't take part in his church's anti-lockdown protest on Saturday outside the governors mansion. 
Anti-lockdown protests have popped up across the country as gun-touting protestors fight against orders they said are unconstitutional and an severe overreach of government. 
'I do not want federal agents to pick me up when I am off the premises of my property,' said Spell.  
Gov. John Bel Edwards announced this week that stay-at-home orders have been extended until May 15. 
Edwards made the decision using regional data that showed areas like Baton Rouge, where Life Tabernacle Church is located, has seen an uptick in new cases and hospitalizations.   
REVEALED: 205 people have donated their stimulus checks to controversial pastor Tony Spell as he ignores his house arrest and defies state lockdowns to perform services REVEALED: 205 people have donated their stimulus checks to controversial pastor Tony Spell as he ignores his house arrest and defies state lockdowns to perform services Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 04:49 Rating: 5

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