Teen Vogue Posts ‘Guide to Anal Sex’ on Christmas


teen vogue

Teen Vogue has, once again, published a “guide to anal sex” for their very young readers — this time, on Christmas.

The tweet, which was an article from November, received swift backlash online from concerned parents and people who don’t think outlets, whose target audience is 13-17, should be promoting sex.


Disturbingly, the article is geared very much to their young readers, discussing how not everyone wants “penis-in-vagina” sex. It also boasts that it is “anal 101, for teens, beginners, and all inquisitive folk”
“It’s important that we talk about all kinds of sex because not everyone is having, or wants to have, ‘penis in the vagina’ sex. If you do have ‘penis in the vagina’ sex and are curious about something else, or are finding that that type of sex is not for you and you’d like to explore other options, it’s helpful to know the facts. Even if you do learn more and decide anal sex is not a thing you’d like to try, it doesn’t hurt to have the information,” the explainer begins.
 
From there, things get pretty obscene.
“The anus is full of nerve endings that, for some people, feel awesome when stimulated. The opening of the butthole is where the most nerves are, so you don’t have to put anything very far up there (if you don’t want to) for it to feel good,” Teen Vogue’s explainer continues.
In a section about whether or not it hurts, the magazine says that “Planned Parenthood notes that anal sex can hurt if you’re not relaxed or if you don’t use lube,” but asserts that many people think it feels great.
They suggest “starting by inserting smaller things (like a finger) into your anus, then working up to bigger things (like a penis)” to lessen the pain.
They also discuss fecal matter. Perhaps, if someone is too young to know where fecal matter comes from, they shouldn’t be being sold anal sex.

“That being said, yes, you will come in contact with some fecal matter. You are entering a butthole. It is where poop comes out. Expecting to do anal play and see zero poop isn’t particularly realistic. It’s NOT a big deal. Everyone poops. Everyone has a butt,” Teen Vogue asserts.
The magazine for teenagers frequently pushes the boundaries of extremist politics and sexual degeneracy to minors.
“Anal sex and anal stimulation can be awesome, and if you want to give it a go, you do that. More power to you,” the explainer concludes.
Over the summer, Teen Vogue faced backlash for an op-ed, titled ‘Why Sex Work is Real Work‘ from people across the political spectrum.
Written by Tlaleng Mofokeng, founder of an organization called Nalane for Reproductive Justice, the article calls prostitution to be decriminalized and for children to “fund public campaigns to decrease stigma.”
“The clients who seek sex workers vary, and they’re not just men. The idea of purchasing intimacy and paying for the services can be affirming for many people who need human connection, friendship, and emotional support. Some people may have fantasies and kink preferences that they are able to fulfill with the services of a sex worker,” the article, aimed at children as young as 13, states.
The hyper-political and extremely far-left magazine also published a lengthy article last year glorifying abortion and calling for colleges to offer the procedure on campuses. The article was titled “Teens Are Speaking Up About Their Abortions Through Youth Testify” and told the stories of young women who became abortion advocates after having one.
One of the women describes how she “wants the world to know how much relief and joy her ability to get an abortion has brought her.”
The magazine has also promoted an uncritical “Antifa explainer” which glorified the violent groups and explained to their young audience what they can also do “in their own lives to stop fascism.”
Teen Vogue additionally came under fire after they published a how-to explainer on having anal sex that originally did not even mention practicing safe sex or waiting until you’re older.
“This is anal 101, for teens, beginners and all inquisitive folk,” author Gigi Engle wrote in Teen Vogue’s “A Guide to Anal Sex.” The original version of the story included nothing about engaging in safe sex — but was later edited to urge their teenage readers to use condoms.
Teen Vogue defended the article by calling concerned parents “homophobic.”
“The backlash to this article is rooted in homophobia,”Phillip Picardi, the magazine’s digital editorial director, wrote on Twitter. “It’s also laced in arcane delusion about what it means to be a young person today.”
Teen Vogue Posts ‘Guide to Anal Sex’ on Christmas Teen Vogue Posts ‘Guide to Anal Sex’ on Christmas Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 06:51 Rating: 5

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