'Sudden prominence is a very dehumanizing experience': AOC backs 'vulnerable' Meghan Markle after the Duchess broke down on camera describing life in the spotlight

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has rushed to soothe Meghan Markle after she was moved close to tears telling of her 'struggle' at being in the media spotlight. 
In an emotional interview for an ITV documentary, the Duchess of Sussex's voice cracked as she reveals she has found it difficult to cope after getting married and giving birth, adding: 'Not many people have asked if I'm ok.'
Ocasio-Cortez chimed in with a tweet on Friday: 'Sudden prominence is a very dehumanizing experience. There’s a part of your life that you lose, & it later dawns on you that you’ll never get it back.'
'The people who treat you like a human make all the difference,' continued the freshman Democrat from New York.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has offered succor to Meghan Markle after she was moved close to tears telling of her 'struggle' at being in the media spotlight
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has offered succor to Meghan Markle after she was moved close to tears telling of her 'struggle' at being in the media spotlight
Meghan Markle reveals the struggles she's faced in the spotlight
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Meghan's emotional moment came while she was speaking to ITN News At Ten anchor Tom Bradby for an ITV programme filmed during her and Prince Harry's Africa tour in September.
Asked about the impact the intense public scrutiny has had on her 'physical and mental health' and how Harry is being 'protective' of her after what happened to his mother, she replies: 'Look, any woman especially when they are pregnant you're really vulnerable and so that was made really challenging, and then when you have a new born – you know…
'And especially as a woman, it's a lot. 
'So you add this on top of just trying to be a new mom or trying to be a newlywed it's, well…'
She continues: 'Also thank you for asking, because not many people have asked if I'm OK. But it's a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes.'
Tom asks her: 'And the answer is, would it be fair to say, not really OK, as in it's really been a struggle?' Meghan, visibly upset, then replies: 'Yes.'
Meghan Markle was interviewed by Tom Bradby (pictured) for the ITV documentary
Meghan Markle was interviewed by Tom Bradby (pictured) for the ITV documentary
The Duchess of Sussex said she has found the focus on her after her marriage and giving birth a struggle, adding: 'Not many people have asked if I'm ok'
The Duchess of Sussex said she has found the focus on her after her marriage and giving birth a struggle, adding: 'Not many people have asked if I'm ok'
The interview comes following months of controversy involving Meghan and Harry.
They came under fire for their privacy demands over Archie's christening, their use of private jets, and Meghan's Wimbledon appearance when she banned fans from taking photos.
Just two weeks ago the couple waged war on the media, announcing they were suing the Mail on Sunday over its publication of Meghan's father's letters. 
The letter was revealed by Thomas Markle in an interview in which he said how hurt he was by comments made by the Duchess's friends in an article for People magazine.
The 75-year-old said he did not intend to share a private letter sent by Meghan, but felt pressured to do so after he was 'mischaracterised' in the People article.
'It's a wound that festers' Prince Harry opens up over grief
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A spokesman for the Mail on Sunday said: 'The Mail on Sunday stands by the story it published and will be defending this case vigorously. Specifically, we categorically deny that the Duchess's letter was edited in any way that changed its meaning.' 
The couple are also taking legal action against the Sun and now defunct News of the World over phone hacking allegations. 
For the documentary presenter Tom Bradby followed the couple, and five-month-old Archie throughout their African tour which saw Prince Harry undertake solo engagements.

Meghan Markle's interview with Tom Bradby for ITV documentary

Tom Bradby: 'He's obviously very concerned about protecting you, and protecting you from what he felt his mother went through. 
'Its obviously an area one has to tiptoes into very gently. But I don't know what the impact is on your physical or mental health of all the pressure that you clearly feel under 
Meghan: 'Look, any woman especially when they are pregnant you're really vulnerable and so that was made really challenging, and then when you have a new born – you know…'
Tom: 'It's a long time ago but I remember yeah!'
Meghan: 'And especially as a woman, it's a lot. So you add this on top of just trying to be a new mom or trying to be a newlywed it's, well…
'And, also thank you for asking, because not many people have asked if I'm OK. But it's a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes.'
Tom: 'And the answer is, would it be fair to say, not really OK, as in it's really been a struggle?'
Meghan: 'Yes.'

The hour-long documentary features interviews with the royal couple as well and how they’re balancing public and private life.   
Also in the documentary Prince Harry has given a searingly open interview about the 'festering wound' his mother's death left in his life. 
The Duke of Sussex, 35, told Bradby that every click and flash of a camera in the public eye gives him 'the worst reminder of her life as opposed to the best'.
He says he felt significant pressure being a member of the royal family in the spotlight, and was particularly stressed by the memories of his mother's relationship with the press. 
He was asked: 'Do you feel at peace in a way yet or is it still a sort of wound that festers?'
To which he replied: 'I think probably a wound that festers. 
'I think being part of this family, in this role, in this job, every single time I see a camera, every single time I hear a click, every single time I see a flash it takes me straight back, so in that respect it's the worst reminder of her life as opposed to the best.' 
Meghan and Harry made the comments during his and his wife's recent 10-day tour of Africa during which the prince emotionally retraced his mother's footsteps 22 years after her death. 
During the interviews, due to be broadcast on Sunday at 9pm on ITV, Prince Harry says that media focus around being a member of the Royal family means he 'gets reminded of the bad stuff'.
He added: 'Being here now, 22 years later, trying to finish what she started will be incredibly emotional. But everything I do reminds of her. 
In a heartbreaking interview, the Duke of Sussex, 35, (pictured) told ITV News at Ten anchor, Tom Bradby, (also pictured) that every click and flash of a camera in the public eye gives him 'the worst reminder of her life as opposed to the best'
In a heartbreaking interview, the Duke of Sussex, 35, (pictured) told ITV News at Ten anchor, Tom Bradby, (also pictured) that every click and flash of a camera in the public eye gives him 'the worst reminder of her life as opposed to the best'
Harry made the comments during his and his wife's recent 10-day tour of Africa during which he emotionally retraced his mother's footsteps 22 years after her death (Diana is pictured with Harry on holiday in Majorca, Spain on August 10, 1987)
Harry made the comments during his and his wife's recent 10-day tour of Africa during which he emotionally retraced his mother's footsteps 22 years after her death (Diana is pictured with Harry on holiday in Majorca, Spain on August 10, 1987)
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex and their son Archie meet with Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Mrs Tutu at their legacy foundation in Cape Town, on day three of their tour of Africa last month
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex and their son Archie meet with Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Mrs Tutu at their legacy foundation in Cape Town, on day three of their tour of Africa last month

'But as I said, with the role, with the job and the sort of the pressure that come with that I get reminded of the bad stuff, unfortunately.'  
During the tour Prince Harry paid an 'emotional' visit to a street in Angola that was once a minefield visited by his mother Diana shortly before her death.
Princess Diana walked across a cleared minefield near the central city of Huambo in 1997 to highlight the plight of a country that remains plagued by land mines 17 years after the end of its civil war.
The images of her in body armour and a mask gave the anti-landmine campaign global recognition. 
Just months later Diana was killed in a car crash in Paris, when Harry was 12.
'It has been emotional retracing my mother's steps along this street 22 years on,' said Harry, standing on Huambo's now-paved Princess Diana Street during the tour.
'Being here on this transformed and bustling street... shows the tremendous impact that clearing landmines has on communities and their futures.'
Last month the Duke of Sussex walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust
Last month the Duke of Sussex walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust
Harry's mother Diana visited a minefield in Angola in January, 1997. The Princess of Wales visited Huambo to bring global attention to the crisis of landmines and the people whose lives were being destroyed
Harry's mother Diana visited a minefield in Angola in January, 1997. The Princess of Wales visited Huambo to bring global attention to the crisis of landmines and the people whose lives were being destroyed
Prince Harry says it's 'emotional to walk in his mother's footsteps
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Prince Harry (second from right) walks behind his mother Diana's coffin alongside Prince Philip, Prince William, Earl Spencer and Prince Charles
Prince Harry (second from right) walks behind his mother Diana's coffin alongside Prince Philip, Prince William, Earl Spencer and Prince Charles 
Prince William, left, and Prince Harry gesture after they arrived at Kensington Palace to view some of the flowers and mementos left in memory of their mother Princess Diana in London in 1997
Prince William, left, and Prince Harry gesture after they arrived at Kensington Palace to view some of the flowers and mementos left in memory of their mother Princess Diana in London in 1997
Princess Diana with Prince Harry on Royal Yacht Britannia visiting Venice British royal tour of Italy in 1985
Princess Diana with Prince Harry on Royal Yacht Britannia visiting Venice British royal tour of Italy in 1985
Diana drew attention to the more than one million landmines planted during Angola's 27-year war, which started after independence from Portugal in 1975.
'There are still more than 1,000 minefields in this beautiful country that remain to be cleared,' said Harry, questioning whether 'that could still be the case' if Diana were alive.
'I'm pretty sure she would have seen it through,' he added. 
His latest interview comes after The Duke of Sussex, while on the Africa tour, released attacked the British media as he accused the press of 'bullying' and 'relentless propaganda'. 
In a lengthy personal statement on his and Meghan's  official website, Harry referenced Princess Diana and said his 'deepest fear' was his 'wife falling victim to the same powerful forces' that his mother faced. 
And then days later he launched legal action against the owners of the Sun and the Daily Mirror over allegations his voicemail messages were illegally intercepted.
Yesterday the charity boss who arranged for Prince Harry to visit the spot where Princess Diana famously walked through a minefield has said how 'emotional' the moment was for her son. 
Halo Trust chief executive James Cowan last month accompanied Harry in Huambo, Angola, to the area where his mother took the same 54-yard stroll 22 years earlier. 
Former Black Watch commanding officer Mr Cowan, 55, said Harry was 'hugely struck' by the transformation in Huambo when he visited on his and Meghan's tour of southern Africa. 
He added: 'It was clearly an emotional visit for Prince Harry to follow in his mother's footsteps and see her legacy in Huambo first-hand.
'This visit mattered a great deal to him. He was hugely struck by the transformation in Huambo and is incredibly passionate about honouring the work started by his mother.
'He is committed to helping Halo emulate in Angola what we've achieved in Mozambique by making it mine free.' 
Harry is pictured sitting beneath the Diana Tree in Huambo, which marks the spot where she was photographed in 1997
Harry is pictured sitting beneath the Diana Tree in Huambo, which marks the spot where she was photographed in 1997 
Signs saying 'danger mines' are the same as the ones his mother was pictured with in 1997
Signs saying 'danger mines' are the same as the ones his mother was pictured with in 1997 
Harry follows in Diana's footsteps during Angola minefield visit
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Mr Cowan, who joined the Scottish-based landmine clearance charity in 2015, said Harry has a 'great sense of what really matters in the world'.
He added: 'I know Prince Harry a little bit from our time in the military and I've been delighted to work with him at Halo.
'He's funny, he's got charisma, and he's also got a great sense of what really matters in this world. I think that is a very wonderful combination.'
Diana never saw her work to help outlaw landmines come to fruition as she died later in the same year as her visit to Angola, a few months before the international treaty to ban the weapons was signed.
The site has since been transformed into a wide residential road called Avenida 28 de Maio - but is affectionately known among locals as Princess Diana Street. 
'Sudden prominence is a very dehumanizing experience': AOC backs 'vulnerable' Meghan Markle after the Duchess broke down on camera describing life in the spotlight 'Sudden prominence is a very dehumanizing experience': AOC backs 'vulnerable' Meghan Markle after the Duchess broke down on camera describing life in the spotlight Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 08:48 Rating: 5

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