'Equal pay for equal play': Adidas says it will give women's soccer World Cup winners the same bonus as men

Adidas says it will give its sponsored players on the Women's World Cup-winning soccer team the same bonus as their male counterparts.
The company confirmed on Twitter that it believes 'in inspiring and enabling the next generation of female athletes, creators and leaders through breaking barriers.'
'Today we are announcing that all Adidas athletes on the winning 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup team will receive the same performance bonus payout as their male peers,' read the statement by Eric Liedtke of Adidas. 
Captioning the tweet was 'Equal pay for equal play. #WWC #WorldCup.'
U.S. midfielder Julie Ertz stands on the pitch after the team's 2-2 draw against England in a SheBelieves Cup women's soccer match Saturday, March 2, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Ertz honors Carrie Underwood by wearing her name on the back of her jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)
U.S. midfielder Julie Ertz stands on the pitch after the team's 2-2 draw against England in a SheBelieves Cup women's soccer match Saturday, March 2, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Ertz honors Carrie Underwood by wearing her name on the back of her jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)
Adidas tweeted its statement of equality on Friday, International Women's Day
Adidas tweeted its statement of equality on Friday, International Women's Day

On Friday - International Women's Day - American players filed a federal discrimination lawsuit against the US Soccer Federation over equal treatment and pay. 
The players alleged ongoing 'institutionalized gender discrimination' that includes unequal pay with their counterparts on the men's national team.
We believe it is our duty to be the role models that we've set out to be and fight to what we know we legally deserve,' forward Christen Press told The Associated Press. 'And hopefully in that way it inspires women everywhere.' 
The USSF has maintained in the past that much of the pay disparity between the men's and women's teams results from separate collective bargaining agreements.
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Forward Christen Press (23) handles the ball during the second half against Brazil in a She Believes Cup women's soccer match at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida
Forward Christen Press (23) handles the ball during the second half against Brazil in a She Believes Cup women's soccer match at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida
Brazil's Marta (L) trips going after United States's Megan Rapinoe (R) during the 2019 SheBelieves Cup soccer match
Brazil's Marta (L) trips going after United States's Megan Rapinoe (R) during the 2019 SheBelieves Cup soccer match
'At the heart of this whole issue we believe that it's the right thing. We believe that there has been discrimination against us,' midfielder Megan Rapinoe said. 
'And while we have fought very hard and for a long time, whether that be through our CBA or through our players association, putting ourselves in the best possible position that we can to get the best deal that we can, we still feel that we don't have what we're trying to achieve, which is equality in the workplace.' 
The US defends its title at the Women's World Cup, which starts June 7 in France.
'Equal pay for equal play': Adidas says it will give women's soccer World Cup winners the same bonus as men 'Equal pay for equal play': Adidas says it will give women's soccer World Cup winners the same bonus as men Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 08:27 Rating: 5

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