Embattled NY Governor Andrew Cuomo is hit by claims from two more women after New York Attorney General branded him a serial sex pest, bringing his total number of accusers to 13

 Two more women have approached the New York state Attorney General's Office reporting allegations of sexual harassment against Governor Andrew Cuomo

The fresh allegations come days after the state's Attorney General Letitia James released a report accusing Cuomo of sexually harassing 11 women. 

Monday's revelation means the total number of women who've made allegations against Cuomo now stands at 13 

Nine of the accusers are either current of former state employees. 

As for the additional two women, it is still unclear who they are and what they are alleging Cuomo did to them and when the incidents are alleged to have taken place. 

James is not believed to have been briefed on the new allegations, according to the New York Post.  

Cuomo has not been seen in public since James' report was released last Tuesday.

The governor released a pre-recorded video statement where he denied having ever 'touched anyone inappropriately' suggesting James' investigation had been politically motivated. 

Two more women have approached the New York state Attorney General’s Office reporting allegations of sexual harassment against Governor Andrew Cuomo

Two more women have approached the New York state Attorney General's Office reporting allegations of sexual harassment against Governor Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is seen at the Governor's mansion. Last week, an investigation found that Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women in and out of state government

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is seen at the Governor's mansion. Last week, an investigation found that Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women in and out of state government

Gov. Andrew Cuomo talks on the phone while walking with his dog Captain at the New York state Executive Mansion on  Saturday

Gov. Andrew Cuomo talks on the phone while walking with his dog Captain at the New York state Executive Mansion on  Saturday

On Sunday, it was reported that Cuomo and his aides had been trying to cut a deal with his party whereby he would not run for a fourth term as governor next week, in return for avoiding an impeachment trial. Those talks appear to have foundered, with the governor's top aide Melissa DeRosa announcing her resignation Sunday.

On Monday, it was revealed DeRosa resigned because she felt his days in office were inevitably numbered, according to a new report. 

DeRosa, 38, who served as the powerful Secretary to the Governor of the State of New York, announced her departure in a statement on Sunday night that notably did not mention Cuomo.

With Cuomo facing pressure to resign and the threat of impeachment after the New York Attorney General's report branding him a sex pest, DeRosa believed he had no path to stay in office, and was no longer willing to stand up for him in public, a person familiar with the matter told the New York Times.

Attorney General Letitia James' report, which concluded that Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women, was more scathing and damaging than his top aides, including DeRosa, had expected, sources told the newspaper. 

Andrew Cuomo's top aide Melissa DeRosa, pictured on August 2, announced her resignation Sunday night

Andrew Cuomo's top aide Melissa DeRosa, pictured on August 2, announced her resignation Sunday night

DeRosa is seen with Cuomo last May. She reportedly felt he had no path to remain in office after a damaging report concluded he sexually harassed 11 women

DeRosa is seen with Cuomo last May. She reportedly felt he had no path to remain in office after a damaging report concluded he sexually harassed 11 women

DeRosa, Cuomo's closest aide, resigned after admitting in a statement that 'the past two years have been emotionally and mentally trying.'  

'It has been the greatest honor of my life to serve the people of New York for the past 10 years,' DeRosa said in a statement. 'New Yorkers' resilience, strength and optimism through the most difficult times has inspired me every day. 

'Personally, the past two years have been emotionally and mentally trying. I am forever grateful for the opportunity to have worked with such talented and committed colleagues.'  

Tellingly, DeRosa's statement did not make a single reference to Cuomo, to whom she is said to have been extremely close. 

Brittany Commisso, left, is seen answering questions during an interview with CBS correspondent Jericka Duncan on CBS This Morning on Monday morning

Brittany Commisso, left, is seen answering questions during an interview with CBS correspondent Jericka Duncan on CBS This Morning on Monday morning

On Monday, accuser Brittany Commisso appeared on CBS This Morning to talk about how he 'groped' her when she worked for him

On Monday, accuser Brittany Commisso appeared on CBS This Morning to talk about how he 'groped' her when she worked for him 

Cuomo - who for months said the public would be 'shocked' once he shared his side of the story - has not spoken publicly since the release of a 168-page report written by two independent attorneys who were selected by the state attorney general to investigate.

A female executive assistant who accused Cuomo of groping her said that what the governor did to her was a crime. She was the first woman to file a criminal complaint against Cuomo.

In her first public interview in which she identified herself, Brittany Commisso told CBS This Morning that the governor 'needs to be held accountable.'

Commisso has said Cuomo reached under her shirt and fondled her when they were alone in a room at the Executive Mansion last year and on another occasion rubbed her rear end while they posed for a photo.

'He broke the law,' she said on Monday morning's interview.

In the interview, Commisso also described how Cuomo's advances grew bolder over time and explained that she was afraid to come forward due to his power.

'People don't understand - it's the governor of the state of New York. He is a professional fighter,' she said. 'It hasn't been easy.'

Cuomo has flat-out denied that he ever touched anyone inappropriately, but he acknowledged hugging and kissing aides and other individuals.  

Assembly Judiciary Committee Chair Charles Lavine, speaks as the Judiciary Committee meets to discuss the next steps in its impeachment investigation of Gov, Andrew Cuomo on Monday

Assembly Judiciary Committee Chair Charles Lavine, speaks as the Judiciary Committee meets to discuss the next steps in its impeachment investigation of Gov, Andrew Cuomo on Monday


The New York State Assembly's Judiciary Committee Charles Lavine said on Monday that the committee would hold two executive sessions to discuss its ongoing impeachment inquiry of Cuomo on August 16 and August 23, followed by at least two public hearings, where experts will be called to testify on sexual assault and harassment and the impeachment process itself.

The Committee will recommend whether to impeach Cuomo after fully reviewing the evidence, he said.

'We anticipate that this process will be concluded very soon ... and when I say very soon I'm speaking about several weeks,' Lavine told reporters.

Lavine defended the process' length, saying that lawmakers 'owe it to the people in the state of New York' to examine the evidence in the attorney general's report before moving to impeach 

Embattled NY Governor Andrew Cuomo is hit by claims from two more women after New York Attorney General branded him a serial sex pest, bringing his total number of accusers to 13 Embattled NY Governor Andrew Cuomo is hit by claims from two more women after New York Attorney General branded him a serial sex pest, bringing his total number of accusers to 13 Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 06:04 Rating: 5

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