Beach house owners off the coast of North Carolina SUE the Outer Banks so they can get to their vacation homes during the coronavirus pandemic after cops blocked the only two bridges onto the barrier islands

A group of North Carolina property owners have filed a federal lawsuit against local officials who have blocked them from accessing their second homes on the barrier islands of the Outer Banks during the coronavirus pandemic. 
On March 20, North Carolina's Dare County - which includes the middle part of the Outer Banks - issued an order barring non-state residents from entering the area in a bid to stop the spread of COVID-19. 
Checkpoints have been set up along major highways, and those trying to enter the county must produce a North Carolina driver's license or a 'Permanent Resident Permit'. 
Bu the move has angered many out-of-state property owners who have ritzy beach houses in the area and wanted to retreat to them amid the pandemic. 
On Wednesday, six of those out-of-state property owners sued Dare County,  claiming the ban violates the 'privileges and immunities' clause of the US Constitution. 
A group of Outer Banks property owners have filed a federal lawsuit against local officials who have blocked them from accessing their second homes during the coronavirus pandemic. Houses along the Outer Banks are pictured
A group of Outer Banks property owners have filed a federal lawsuit against local officials who have blocked them from accessing their second homes during the coronavirus pandemic. Houses along the Outer Banks are pictured
Checkpoints have been set up along major highways, and those trying to enter the county must produce a North Carolina driver's license or a 'Permanent Resident Permit'. Local Kari Pugh snapped this photo
Checkpoints have been set up along major highways, and those trying to enter the county must produce a North Carolina driver's license or a 'Permanent Resident Permit'. Local Kari Pugh snapped this photo 
The clause states that citizens of each state are entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in every other state. 
Attorney Chuck Kitchen, who is leading the lawsuit, told OBX Today that his clients 'simply want to get to the property they own and pay for'.
A copy of the suit reads: 'If not enjoined by this Court, Dare County will continue to discriminate against the Plaintiffs, and deprive them of their Constitutional rights. The Plaintiffs will suffer irreparable injury due to this deprivation of Constitutional rights.' 
Kitchen believes that if the suit is successful it will set a precedent, meaning others across the country who have found themselves blocked out of different states will be able to file and win similar cases. 
Counties across the country have reduced their access or closed their borders amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 15,000 lives. 
Attorney Chuck Kitchen, who is leading the lawsuit, told OBX Today : ' They simply want to get to the property they own and pay for'. Homes on the Outer Banks are pictured
Attorney Chuck Kitchen, who is leading the lawsuit, told OBX Today : ' They simply want to get to the property they own and pay for'. Homes on the Outer Banks are pictured
Authorities have blocked off access points to the county, requiring drivers to produce state ID
Authorities have blocked off access points to the county, requiring drivers to produce state ID 
Millions of affluent residents in cities have fled to their second homes in more sparsely populated areas which has sparked angry backlash from locals. 
Last week, Rhode Island ordered fleeing New York residents to quarantine for 14 days after entering the state. New York's Gov. Andrew Cuomo responded that the move was illegal and threatened to sue. 
Meanwhile, others have accused fleeing New York City residents of spreading the virus, with many accusing Big Apple locals of bringing COVID-19 with them whilst fleeing to the beach houses in Florida. 
Elsewhere, New York City's elite have decamped to areas in The Hamptons, with stores experiencing a shortage of essentials due to an increased run on supplies. 
Beach house owners off the coast of North Carolina SUE the Outer Banks so they can get to their vacation homes during the coronavirus pandemic after cops blocked the only two bridges onto the barrier islands Beach house owners off the coast of North Carolina SUE the Outer Banks so they can get to their vacation homes during the coronavirus pandemic after cops blocked the only two bridges onto the barrier islands Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 06:07 Rating: 5

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