The town that time forgot: Rodney was once a bustling home to 4,000 and tipped to be Mississippi's state capital... now it lies deserted, ruined by the American Civil war when it was pounded by heavy artillery fire (10 Pics)

The remains of a Mississippi ghost town that nearly became the state's capital before it was deserted following the events of the Civil War have been captured in a series of eerie images. 
The once-bustling southwestern town of Rodney, in Jefferson County, was an essential part of the route frequently used by Native Americans in the Mississippi River Delta.
Haunting photographs show the red-brick Presbyterian church - the only original building from Old Rodney - a white Baptist church that stands as a decaying time capsule and a cemetery filled with grave stones, both built after 1763 when the town was inhabited by the French.
A ramshackle Masonic house is one of the last few buildings still standing in the southwestern Mississippi town of Rodney, in Jefferson County, that nearly became the state's capital in the 19th century
The red-brick Presbyterian church is the only original building constructed by the Native Americans before the town was inhabited by the French in 1763. Rodney was once home to more than 4,000 residents but is now a ghost town no longer officially recognized on the state's list of towns
A white Baptist church stands as a decaying time capsule in the former town famed for its vibrant cultural life, numerous fairs, and noisy trade activity. By 1860 it had two banks, a GP, barbers, dentists, more than 35 stores and bakers, hotels and river boat taverns
A rusted lonely red cabin that survived an 1863 barrage from a Union navy gunboat named the Rattler that laid waste to most of the town. The conflict only came to an end when Confederate soldiers managed to capture the navy captain and several soldiers and threaten to hang them
A cemetery filled with grave stones of residents that occupied the town in the 19th century. One grave reads: 'Fannie Winters. Born June 20, 1859. Died December 5 1883'
Other striking shots show a ramshackle Masonic house, a lonely red cabin and an old general store.  At its peak, Rodney was a cultural and economic center for the state and was only three votes away from becoming Mississippi’s capital.
In its heyday the town was famed for its vibrant cultural life, numerous fairs, and noisy trade activity - becoming the home of more than 4,000 residents.
By 1860 it had two banks, a GP, barbers, dentists, more than 35 stores and bakers, hotels and river boat taverns. But during the American Civil War, the town found itself in the middle of a of a battle. 
In September 1863, a Union navy gunboat named the Rattler launched an artillery bombardment on the town, laying waste to much of the area.
A dilapidated brick home is covered in green creeper and moss after being left to rot for more than a century
The grave of 63-year-old Anna Margaret Singer - a native of Tubingen, Germany, still stands in the town of Rodney
Inside the baptist church old pieces of furniture lay strewn around the room. Following the Civil War he town went under a rebuild and it was decided that a railroad would be constructed crossing the Mississippi River

The citizens continued to leave their homes without stopping and eventually in 1930, even though several people still lived there, it was officially removed from the state's list of towns
The Confederate soldiers managed to capture the navy captain and several soldiers and threatened to hang them if the conflict didn't stop.
The battle ended, but many buildings were seriously damaged. In the following years, the town went under a rebuild and it was decided that a railroad would be constructed crossing the Mississippi River. 
Because of the huge reconstruction a large ridge of sand was made in the river, changing the course of the water two miles west of Rodney.
As a result of this intervention the area was economically ruined forever. The citizens continued to leave their homes without stopping and eventually in 1930, even though several people still lived there, it was officially removed from the state's list of towns. 
The town that time forgot: Rodney was once a bustling home to 4,000 and tipped to be Mississippi's state capital... now it lies deserted, ruined by the American Civil war when it was pounded by heavy artillery fire (10 Pics) The town that time forgot: Rodney was once a bustling home to 4,000 and tipped to be Mississippi's state capital... now it lies deserted, ruined by the American Civil war when it was pounded by heavy artillery fire (10 Pics) Reviewed by STATION GOSSIP on 10:32 Rating: 5

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