A curvaceous new footbridge inspired by the Mobius strip has opened in Changsha, China, that offers pedestrians a variety of different routes across the Dragon King Harbour River. At 185 meters long and 24 meters high “Lucky Knot Bridge” rises and falls across its course offering spectacular views of the river, Meixi Lake, the city of Changsha and the surrounding mountain range.

The bridge’s designer, NEXT Architects —who has offices in Amsterdam and Beijing— was invited to take part in an international competition to design a new bridge to be constructed in Changsha's rapidly developing ‘New Lake District’, about three years ago. The winning design —the Lucky Knot— was inspired as much by the Mobius strip as the ancient Chinese art of decorative knotting. In Chinese folk art, the knot symbolizes luck and prosperity. The bridge, which connects multiple levels —the river banks, the road and a park— at different heights, literally and metaphorically knots all these routes together.





On June 2012, the last of the coal mines operating in the Saarland region in west Germany closed, marking the end of a 250-year history of mining in the region. Four years later, a 30-meter-tall structure called ‘The Polygon’ was erected on Bergehalde Ensdorf, one of the biggest slag heaps on Saarland, that rises some 150 meters above the surrounding Saar Valley. Due to its exposed location, the polygon is visible from all around the valley. Those who ascend to the top of the structure, to the 35-meter long platform, are treated with a magnificent view of the land around and the city of Saarlouis.

Designed by Berlin architect Katja Pfeiffer and Oliver Sachse, the walk-in monument consist of two slanting towers connected by a bridge. Depending on which direction you look at the monument from, ‘The Polygon’ changes shape, assuming the form of a rectangular arch, an inverted triangle, an inverted V, an hourglass-like structure and finally like the alphabet T falling on to its side. The shape of ‘The Polygon’ itself vaguely resembles the supporting structures that have been used in underground mining.






In the Töölö neighborhood of Helsinki, Finland, in the middle of an ordinary residential square, a scene from the Steven Spielberg's movie War of the Worlds appears to be unfolding. A giant alien machine has just woken up from deep slumber and is pushing its way out of the ground, where it had been lying dormant for millenniums. A gigantic hole has cracked open on the bedrock and the enormous dome of the alien robot is just visible above the ground. While the movie, based on H.G. Wells classic by the same name, is a work of fiction, the thing here in Helsinki is entirely real. But this mysterious subterranean creature is not a killing machine. On the contrary, it’s a place of worship, a church.
The Temppeliaukio Church, commonly known as the Rock Church, is excavated directly on to the solid rock. The structure is barely visible from the street level with only the copper dome poking out of the rock. Much of its lies underground, bathed in natural light that filters through the skylight surrounding the center copper dome. A thick rocky wall surrounds the entire structure. The rough, virtually unworked rock surfaces on the interior has given the church an excellent acoustic quality making it a popular venue for concerts.

Designed by architects and brothers Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen and opened in 1969, the Temppeliaukio church is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city, visited by half a million people annually.









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